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Seasonal imported produce

davecook
#11
by davecook
I was told about 40 years ago by an old gardener that if you planted a peach stone, you would get a nectarine tree. I never doubted his wisdom on anything else, but I never put this bit of old wisdon to the test. I do know you should put the stone into a fridge for a while to replicate Winter before planting (called stratifying).

With so many new hybrid varieties having been cloned and developed over the last few years, I suspect that it might not be as easy to produce a reliable cropping tree from a stone as it sounds for our climate. A link here gives more about peaches and nectarines, it also mentions peach trees apparently producing nectarines, which corraborates with my old gardener source......
:http://www.thefruitpages.com/peaches.shtml
All humans should be free range and never kept in offices!
doniv
#12
by doniv
I'd be a bit circumspect about trying to grow peach from seed, as they & nectarines are all prunus, like plums.

In common with apples & cherries, what grows from the seed, will depend on the whim of the bee which pollinated the flower.

Interesting about the nectarines from peach tree quirk !

Just a thought about seasonal food being "Nature's way" of keeping us healthy -

Man evolved in Africa & walked to the rest of the world, so how clever nature would be, to organise it's harvests in the UK entirely for the benefit of the human race
'Tis the time's plague, when madmen lead the blind. - Shakespear - King Lear
alchemist
#13
by alchemist
Don,

If peaches are grown in a peach orchard there is a fairly good chance that it was pollinated from another peach, as they are in flower quite early. The only thing in this country that might cross pollinate is blackthorn, and I don't know if there is anything else where peaches are mainly grown. The growers might try to remove it from near the orchard if there is.

I suspect that as far as the human race is concerned it is a matter of man finding food at all times of the year and breeding plants to help. In places where there is no vegetable harvest like the Arctic, people eat meat and fish. Man just didn't go where there was nothing to eat.

Judging by the way peach stones in my compost heap stay there for years, it takes some effort to get a peach to germinate anyway.
davecook
#14
by davecook
Strangely, something that is likely to cross pollinate with a peach is an almond, they are surprisingly closely related. Not a major problem for peaches, but it does cause almonds to be very bitter. Almonds grow almosr wild down in the South of France, so growers there tend to be alert to this, not really a problem here in the UK
All humans should be free range and never kept in offices!
alchemist
#15
by alchemist
Yes, I suppose almonds also flower at this time. Funny peach/almond makes the almond grow bitter.

Going back to Don's comments. We have some prunus in our wood that we still have not identified. It looks like blackthorn, but either because of where it grows, or it's natural habit it is long and thin not bushy like blackthorn. We have it down as prunus spp. One day one of the smaller trees will fruit and we will see what it is. Most of the big ones have fallen over now, but there are suckers/coppice rods growing so we have not lost it.
@nGoose
#16
by @nGoose
Posted by: Mr GI am fairly well versed in the traditional seasons for English produce but what about imported goods, that is, for example, what time of year is best for buying peaches and where do the best ones come from? Do pineapples have a traditional season for import? Have some imports that were, in the past, seasonal, become available throughout the year in more recent times. For example, I try to buy strawberries during their traditional season, rather than buy those sour poly-tunnel abominations that are around earlier or later in the year; can I apply these same sensibilities to imported produce? Good Post, Mangoes End of May to August, Mostly June July. Forget supermarkets, Waitrose have some unique Indian varieties, at a price. The other supermarkets are rubish. Asian shops are the best bet . Indian are the best, Pakistani are a close second. Pakistani are bigger so perhaps better value. Buying a box can be a good deal.

 

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